Parasite (2019)

Director: Bong Joon-ho

Cast: Song Kang-ho, Lee Sun-kyun, Jo Yeo-jeong, Choi Woo-sik, Park So-dam, Lee Jeong-eun, Jang Hye-jin

Screenplay: Han Jin Won, Bong Joon-ho

132 mins. Rated R for language, some violence and sexual content.

IMDb Top 250: #45 (as of 11/14/2019)

 

Parasite really exploded onto the film scene in such a dynamic way. It’s a movie that I knew virtually nothing about before seeing, and my only connection was director Bong Joon-ho (Okja, Snowpiercer), and even then, I’ve only seen one of his films, so I was completely blind. That, as it turns out, was the perfect way to see this film.

Parasite is the story of Ki-taek (Song Kang-ho, Memories of Murder, The Drug King) and his family as they con their way into good standing with the Parks, a wealthy upscale family, and the potential unraveling of their facade when unexpected new circumstances reveal themselves and complicate the matter.

Parasite is a film about classes and social standing. The Kim family is one of lower-standing, and their decision is simple: manipulate their way up, feeding off of whoever they need to. The film views them in a dingy way, presenting us with likable bad folks who are looking for their fair chance at things. It’s fairly straight-forward for a good bulk of the film before, and I wouldn’t consider this too much a spoiler, the film takes a turn that I did not expect, asking questions about the true nature of the Kims and the real parasites among societies.

The film flourishes with symbolism about the struggle, unbeknownst to the “victims,” between the Kims and the Parks. There are subtleties to the visuals of the film but Bong puts everything on display here, and through his obvious examination of the haves and the have-nots, he weaves a narrative that stayed with me long after my first viewing. Parasite has infested itself within me and I just need to see it again.

Parasite is excellent filmmaking, a story of manipulation and feeding off of one another. There are no good guys or bad guys in the film; everyone exists in a gray area. It’s bursting with excellent performances and biting social commentary, and the narrative is full of black comedy and some of the tensest plotting I’ve seen in quite some time. You should absolutely see it. Then, you should absolutely see it again.

 

4.5/5

-Kyle A. Goethe

 

 

For my review of Bong Joon-ho’s Okja, click here.

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