Warner Bros. Teases Major Film Announcements

There’s been a lot of projects being moved around right now as the impacts of the Coronavirus are felt throughout the industry. With all that, though, new projects are still being green-lit, or in this case, teased.

Warner Bros. has been using their social media platforms to tease announcements related to several major IPs. Specifically, their Instagram has hinted at important September announcements for The Goonies, Beetlejuice, and Sherlock Holmes (the Guy Ritchie films).

For The Goonies and Beetlejuice, several commentators online have deduced that the most likely connection is not sequels or remakes but 4k gift sets, both of which are scheduled to street date in September.

So what’s the deal with Sherlock Holmes? Will this film receive a gift set? Is one warranted? The film isn’t that old, and it doesn’t have the same following that a major WB film like The Goonies or Beetlejuice. Do these posts have anything in common or is it just coincidental and we’re reading too much into it? That seems the most likely option, but let’s dig a little deeper.

Sherlock Holmes has had a third film in development for some time, and now that Robert Downey Jr. is no longer Iron Man, this may open the door for that third film quite nicely. The last I heard, Rocketman and Eddie the Eagle director Dexter Fletcher was attached to the sequel (please give us a villainous turn from Taron Egerton) but that was some time ago and Fletcher has his name attached to several projects. Could this be a sequel finally moving forward?

If that’s the case, maybe that means that sequel announcements for all three films could be in the pipeline. Sure, it’s doubtful, even though sequels have been discussed for decades for The Goonies and Beetlejuice. Steven Spielberg, producer of The Goonies, seemed to suggest that a sequel could never live up to the original and was, therefore, not worth it. The same has been suggested by various members of the Beetlejuice cast and crew.

So many potential threads and yet so little to really go on here.

So what do you think? Are these sequels or merely 4k releases, and do these posts have anything at all to do with each other? Let me know/Drop a comment below!

 

-Kyle A. Goethe

The Suicide Squad Adds Peter Capaldi

Wait, Who? (Get it? Who?)

Recent Doctor Who star Peter Capaldi has been added to the cast of James Gunn’s The Suicide Squad. At this point, we should just be discussing who in Hollywood won’t be in the film, for timing.

There’s been no word from Warner Bros. on the casting, and no indication has been given for which character Capaldi would play, but the production has also been eyeing Pete Davidson of SNL fame.

I was listening to the argument made for stunt casting, and it made a lot of sense. There’s a lot of added talent for this sequel, and it would make sense that some of it is indeed stunt casting. Bring in a big talent who dies in Act I. The Suicide Squad, as a property, has an ever-evolving and changing crew, and the idea of a lot of death and destruction isn’t new, but imagine introducing tons of stars and then picking off a lot of them, or as I like to call it, the Game of Thrones treatment.

So who would Capaldi play? Who?

Who do you think Peter Capaldi will play? Will he be a member of the squad or perhaps a villain? Let me know/Drop a comment below!

 

-Kyle A. Goethe

1990 It Producers File Lawsuit Against Warner Bros.

Frank Konigsberg and Larry Sanitsky are suing Warner Bros. over their contractual rights to be involved in the new It films.

Konigsberg and Sanitsky were producers on the 1990 miniseries adaptation of Stephen King’s It, and their claim is that they were denied involvement on the 2017 theatrical adaptation and its 2019 sequel. Their claim is that they have contractual rights to involvement on any “sequel, series, remake, or spinoff” of their miniseries, along with a substantial percentage of net profits.

The two are claiming that the 2017 film and its sequel are remakes of their film, and that they are owed their due on it.

So here’s what I have to say on the subject. I don’t have 100% of the details, but it is interesting that they are coming forward a few years after the 2017 It actually released. I’m not sure why they would wait that long when they knew another film adaptation was coming.

Here’s the other thing. It 2017 is not a remake of It 1990. They are both adaptations of the novel by Stephen King. It is not a sequel. It is not a [television] series. It is not a remake. It is not a spinoff. This film is clearly based on the novel and not on the film. There are specific scenes pulled from the novel that were not even featured in the miniseries.

To me, this is two guys who see a money pie and want a slice, and I think they are trying to squirrel their way into some money. They should attempt creating something popular if they want to get money, perhaps, because their claim is BS.

So what do you think? Is this lawsuit bullshit or are they owed? Let me know/Drop a comment below!

 

-Kyle A. Goethe

Neil Gaiman’s Sandman May Actually Happen with Netflix and WB

News and reports of a Sandman film or TV series have ebbed and flowed around the entertainment world for so long that it seemed we would never get an adaptation, and Sandman would find itself among The Crow remake and other development hell projects, but now the possibility of a Sandman series has been reinvigorated by a new deal between Netflix and Warner Bros. Television.

Details are still sketchy, and I’m not going to confirm anything outside of hearing and rumors, but this sounds like the real deal. There is no episode count in any of the reports. What is mentioned is that the series looks to be the most expensive DC Entertainment series ever made.

The last we heard of a Sandman film was with Joseph Gordon-Levitt spearheading the project, but he left a few years back over creative differences, amounting to the fact that he believed the project would be best suited for a series with a big network push. His wish has come true apparently.

I’m very excited, even as someone who hasn’t delved into Sandman much, but it appears that I should get started reading now that we have an actual series seemingly coming together. Stay tuned for more.

So what do you think? Should there be a Sandman series at Netflix or is there a better home for the project? Let me know/Drop a comment below!

 

-Kyle A. Goethe

[Early Review] The Nun (2018)

Director: Corin Hardy

Cast: Demian Bichir, Taissa Farmiga, Jonas Bloquet

Screenplay: Gary Dauberman

96 mins. Rated R for terror, violence, and disturbing/bloody images.

 

I’ve been a fan of The Conjuring universe since the first film, and outside of the original Annabelle film, I’ve found them to be very competently put together as individual films while also contributing nicely to a larger framework. Still, though, there’s been something rather concerning about The Nun and, looking to the future, The Crooked Man. What’s been bothering me about both films have been the narrative that’s been set up within The Conjuring 2. The Nun and The Crooked Man are both very connected to the Warrens and the specific case that they are working on within the film, The Crooked Man purposefully created as an apparition meant to frighten or horrify one particular child. I just couldn’t see how a film could be formed that respected the characters that have been built and forge a new interesting path. Last night, I saw The Nun at an early press screening, and while being a more competent film that expected, it still struggles to exist without hanging on previous films.

The Nun follows Father Burke (Demian Bichir, The Hateful Eight, Alien: Covenant), a sort-of Catholic detective, who is sent by the Vatican to investigate a horrible suicide by a nun at an abbey in Romania. He is joined by Sister Irene (Taissa Farmiga, The Final Girls, TV’s American Horror Story), a novitiate who suffers from disturbing visions, as the two attempt to unravel the mystery of the suicide and determine what horrors lie within the walls of the abbey.

Comparatively speaking, The Nun is not the worst film in this universe, but it rest on the lower side of things for several small reasons that build to a less-than-incredible experience. The way the film starts made me feel like Warner Bros. put their hands in the post-production process as the opening has a minute-long prologue featuring a montage from The Conjuring 2 all about the Nun. It felt very unneeded and very forced as if the studio-head walked out in front of the audience at the beginning and shouted, “Remember the nun from The Conjuring 2? That’s what this movie is!” You don’t need that. I think without the forced connectivity to the rest of the universe, The Nun works fine as a standalone film. I took a friend to Annabelle: Creation who had only seen the original The Conjuring. He didn’t take issue with the universe connections and enjoyed himself nonetheless. There’s some overworking of the universe connections later on that also could have been trimmed as more of an Easter egg to fans instead of a full-blown forced explanation as well.

I also wasn’t a fan of secondary character Frenchie (Jonas Bloquet, Elle, Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets), the man who helps guide Father Burke and Sister Irene to the Abbey, and the humor he brings to the film. Bloquet is not entirely to blame here. I just found that the combination of the dialogue in Gary Dauberman’s (It, Within) script with Bloquet’s portrayal and the direction by Corin Hardy (The Hallow) combined to make some unfunny pieces of humor that didn’t fit the tone of the narrative. Nothing altogether cringeworthy, but just out of place.

Now, that’s not to say that I hated the film. Far from it. I found myself thoroughly interested in the mystery and the intrigue. I wanted more of it. I did jump quite a bit at some of the more well-planned out scares (though many of the scares are rather similar, someone getting stalked by a nun), and I mildly enjoyed the partnership between Bichir’s Burke and Farmiga’s Irene. It just wasn’t up to par with what I’ve come to expect.

All in all, The Nun is a scary enough film with a flawed screenplay and a little glaringly obvious studio assistance. It’s a nice enough film that should satisfy the audience even if it falls short of its franchise expectations.

 

3/5

-Kyle A. Goethe

 

 

Have you seen The Nun yet? What’s your favorite film in The Conjuring universe? Let me know/Drop a comment below!

 

For my review of David F. Sandberg’s Annabelle: Creation, click here.

For my review of James Wan’s The Conjuring, click here.

For my review of James Wan’s The Conjuring 2, click here.

 

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Infinity War Breaks More Records, Crosses Billion-Dollar Mark

Who didn’t see this one coming, right? Avengers: Infinity War has officially crossed the $1 Billion mark worldwide. It took 11 days for the film to get to the holy land of billions, proving that Marvel and Disney’s shifting of the release date was one of the smartest moves of the year. Domestically, the film is still outpaced by The Force Awakens, but internationally, this behemoth is moving fast.

One important takeaway here is that the film runs close to three hours with trailers and commercials. Looking at DC/Warner Bros. choosing to shorten their DCEU film Justice League to two hours to get more screenings in, it doesn’t seem to have been a problem for Marvel and their cinematic universe.

Another very important note here is that Marvel has “earned” this win with the careful handling of their cinematic universe, and having characters with arcs of up to ten years culminate with this event film is really gratifying for the studio.

I’m overjoyed, as I really loved Avengers: Infinity War despite its nitpicky flaws, and I’m happy the fans seem to love it too.

Have you seen Avengers: Infinity War yet? Of course you have. What did you think? Let me know/drop a comment down below!

 

-Kyle A. Goethe

 

 

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[Harry Potter Day] Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002)

Director: Chris Columbus

Cast: Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma Watson, Kenneth Branagh, John Cleese, Robbie Coltrane, Warwick Davis, Richard Griffiths, Richard Harris, Jason Isaacs, Alan Rickman, Fiona Shaw, Maggie Smith, Julie Walters

Screenplay: Steve Kloves

161 mins. Rated PG.

 

In honor of the twentieth anniversary of the Battle of Hogwarts, I present to you tonight my thoughts on Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, the second film in the Wizarding World franchise.

Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe, Swiss Army Man, Jungle) is not having a very good summer. He hasn’t received letters from any of his new Hogwarts friends like Ron Weasley (Rupert Grint, Moonwalkers, TV’s Snatch) and Hermione Granger (Emma Watson, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, Beauty and the Beast). When he comes across a house-elf named Dobby in his bedroom with a warning, things get a whole lot worse. It seems that Harry Potter is in grave danger as he returns to Hogwarts for a second year. Stories of a Chamber of Secrets and an Heir to Slytherin returning to kill wizards with non-magical parents flitter through the school, and the addition of new Professor Gilderoy Lockhart (Kenneth Branagh, My Week with Marilyn, Dunkirk), a wizard with an elaborate background of adventures and near-death, Harry finds that he will need his friends more than ever.

Director Chris Columbus (Pixels, Percy Jackson& The Olympians: The Lightning Thief) returns to helm this sequel, and it’s without question the most bloated film in the franchise. Columbus keeps things a bit too light and fluffy even with his decision to aim for a darker tone this time around. There’s the sense that Warner Bros. does not have a clear and concise direction as only part of the book series had been published up until this point. To have the shortest novel in the series be the lengthiest film is quite a feat, and the film slogs a bit throughout.

Kenneth Branagh plays Gilderoy Lockhart perfect, just as I had envisioned him while reading the books. Other new additions in the film include Jason Isaacs (The Patriot, TV’s Star Trek: Discovery) as Lucius Malfoy, father to Harry’s rival Draco, and Toby Jones as Dobby. Both performances are spot-on with the tone of the series and make for two characters that I wanted to see return as quickly as possible. Isaacs plays Malfoy with a clean-cut sliminess and Jones rides the line between annoying and goofy with Dobby, never straying too far to either side (there’s a rumor that Russian President Vladamir Putin disliked Dobby as he thought it was a caricature of him).

Overall, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets furthers the mythos with an ending that is incredible, exhilarating, and worth the wait. It is likely the least impressive film in the entire Wizarding World franchise, though, and it could’ve been better with a more-skilled director at the helm. Columbus is better suited to a storyteller and writer than he is behind a camera. The film should entertain fans and steers more to younger audiences than the sequels do, but it’s not technically a bad film. Just a little bit much.

 

3.5/5

-Kyle A. Goethe

 

 

For my review of David Yates’s Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, click here.

For my review of Chris Columbus’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, click here.

For my review of Chris Columbus’s Home Alone, click here.

 

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