Jurassic Park Leads Return for Next Installment

I mean, we all knew that was going to happen, right?

It’s been officially confirmed that Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, and Sam Neill will be returning in roles – not cameos – but actual character appearances in Jurassic World 3. This next film has been teased as the finale of not just the trilogy but the entire saga. That being said, when your franchise brings in billion-dollar takes, this franchise isn’t ending, and soon, we’ll be seeing Jurassic Galaxy, right?

In all seriousness, the three performers that began this saga are coming back to close out this trilogy, and that’s pretty cool news, right?

I like the opportunity to bridge these two halves of the franchise. Up until now, there’s only been a little bit of cross-cover between the Jurassic Park films and the Jurassic World films, specifically Jeff Goldblum in Fallen Kingdom and BD Wong in the World films. To me, having the main cast of Park and the main cast of World actually come together just sets this film down an interesting trajectory.

That’s not to say that Jurassic World 3 isn’t going to suck. It still might, but I think all the recent news from Jurassic World 3 has been solid, from the new short film to this news of the next installment.

So what do you think? Is this the right call? Let me know/Drop a comment below!

Jurassic World 3 finds a way on June 11, 2021.

 

-Kyle A. Goethe

[31 Days of Horror 3] Day 14 – In the Mouth of Madness (1995)

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Director: John Carpenter

Cast: Sam Neill, Jurgen Prochnow, Julie Carmen, Charlton Heston

Screenplay: Michael DeLuca

95 mins. Rated R for images of horror, and for language.

 

Most people who know me know of my love for Halloween. It’s my all-time favorite horror film, but in general, my all-time favorite horror director is John Carpenter. Barring The Ward, there isn’t a single film of his that I wouldn’t watch, and when he hits it, he knocks it out of the park. In the Mouth of Madness is a great example of John Carpenter knocking it out of the park.

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Acclaimed horror novelist Sutter Cane (Jurgen Prochnow, Das Boot, Hitman: Agent 47) is missing. Arcane Publishing is after Cane’s latest manuscript, and they hire insurance investigator John Trent (Sam Neill, Jurassic Park, Hunt for the Wilderpeople) to go after Cane. When Trent is almost killed by a crazed maniac wielding an axe, he begins to discover that there is a lot more hiding in Cane’s books than just words. His search brings him to Hobb’s End, the fictional setting for several of Cane’s novels, a place thought not to exist, and Trent sees that Hobb’s End is very real, and it houses an evil that is more powerful than anyone could have known.

Halloween is a perfect slasher, but In the Mouth of Madness is a perfect study of the human psyche and the power of a story. It is a rich, complex tale about Sutter Cane (who bears more than one similarity with horror novelists Stephen King and H.P. Lovecraft). It is an examination of popular culture and its crazed obsession with horror. It’s a look at John Trent and the fragility of the mind (another popular element in Lovecraft’s).

The performances from Neill and Prochnow are great. The two actors have terrific chemistry even though they share very few scenes in the film. Charlton Heston (Ben-Hur, Planet of the Apes) even appears as Arcane Publishing director Jackson Harglow to add gravitas to the picture.

There are multiple allusions to Lovecraft and King, starting with the opening framing device, often used by Lovecraft in his storytelling. There is talk of the Old Ones, and in fact passages of Cane’s stories actually come from Lovecraft’s own work. From King, there is the style of his novels, the New England setting, and the undying fandom around his next novel.

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In the Mouth of Madness isn’t an easy film to find, but if you can, do so. You will find yourself on a most interesting journey through the mind. It is topped off with great performances and gorgeously disturbing visuals from master of horror John Carpenter, with a shockingly unusual ending to tie it all together. This movie is a one-of-a-kind experience for horror fans all alike.

 

5/5

-Kyle A. Goethe

 

 

For my review of John Carpenter’s Halloween, click here.

For my review of John Carpenter’s The Thing, click here.

[Oscar Madness] Jurassic Park (1993)

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Director: Steven Spielberg

Cast: Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Attenborough, Ariana Richards, Joseph Mazzello, Bob Peck, Martin Ferrero, Wayne Knight, Samuel L. Jackson

Screenplay: Michael Crichton, David Koepp

127 mins. Rated PG-13 for intense science fiction terror.

  • Academy Award Winner: Best Sound
  • Academy Award Winner: Best Effects, Sound Effects Editing
  • Academy Award Winner: Best Effects, Visual Effects

 

I’m going to tell you a story now. When I was a young child, I was positively blown away by Jurassic Park. I just always wanted to watch it. Unfortunately for me, I was absolutely terrified of the film. I never got past the famous T-Rex sequence without running out of the room as fast as possible. Finally, when my next-door neighbor volunteered to babysit me one night, he made me a promise: We were getting through Jurassic Park tonight. And we did. And it remains one of the most thrilling examples of perfect filmmaking even now, 22 years later.

Dr. Alan Grant (Sam Neill, TV’s Peaky Blinders, The Hunt for Red October) and his colleague Dr. Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern, The Fault in Our Stars, Wild) have just been hired by John Hammond (Richard Attenborough, The Great Escape, Elizabeth) to look into his newest project, an amusement park on the island of Isla Nublar. They are joined by Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum, Independence Day, Mortdecai), an observer of the Chaos Theory, as the three discover that Jurassic Park is filled with genetically cloned dinosaurs. When the island’s security defenses go down, the dinosaurs are unleashed, and the scientists must find a way off the island before chaos takes them out.

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First of all, I want to discuss the screenplay from Michael Crichton and David Koepp. I love the original novel and this adaptation is pretty damn close in the overall scope and the tone conveyed. There are a few changes and a few scenes omitted in the name of time, but the script is pretty great for both an adaptation and a film in general.

The list of performers, Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, and Richard Attenborough are so perfectly cast that it amazes me. Add in veteran character actors Bob Peck (The Black Velvet Gown, Slipstream), Martin Ferrero (Heat, Air Bud 3), and Wayne Knight (TV’s The Exes, Space Jam), and you have some genuinely perfectly cast players.

Director Steven Spielberg (Saving Private Ryan, Lincoln) had so much invested in this project, and so much faith in it at the same time. It is refreshing to find a director that cares so much about a project. His care for pushing the visual effects envelope while maintaining his style and flair for the suspense and the fantastic.

The look and sound of the dinosaurs literally created the modern view of dinosaurs in film. The incredible sound work (the noises of the velociraptor hatching were created by cracking an ice cream cone and the squishing of a cantaloupe and pineapple) is what earns this film the realism that Spielberg so desperately wanted.

Lastly, I wanted to discuss the famous scene in which the T-Rex’s movement causes a water ripple in a glass. The sound originally came to Steven Spielberg while listening to Earth, Wind & Fire. His production team eventually, after many, many failures, created the effect with a guitar string placed underneath the fake dashboard.

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Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park stands as one of the most groundbreaking and equally effective films of its or any generation. The film still looks gorgeous and has stood the test of time. The special effects haven’t even aged all that much. My hope is that Jurassic World is even partially as good as this one.

 

5/5

-Kyle A. Goethe

31 Days of Horror: Day 12 – Daybreakers (2009)

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Director: Michael Spierig, Peter Spierig

Cast: Ethan Hawke, Willem Dafoe, Claudia Karvan, Sam Neill, Vince Colosimo, Isabel Lucas

Screenplay: Michael Spierig, Peter Spierig

98 mins. Rated R for strong bloody violence, language and brief nudity.

 

There are so many great ideas in filmmaking today. Ideas for completely new stories and ideas for imagining old stories in a completely new way. Most of these ideas get muddled by poor direction, cheap performances, and no subtlety. Daybreakers is one of those films that takes its idea, a reworking of the vampire myth, and brings it all the way through to fruition.

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Daybreakers exists in a world where the undead have taken over the planet. Vampires have a lifestyle all their own. Humans are on the run, the few that are left, that is. The others have been contained and are being bled dry to feed the ever-weakening population that can’t be regularly fed. Blood prices are up and the world is on the brink. It’s the story of Edward Dalton (Ethan Hawke, Training Day, Boyhood), a vampire scientist trying to discover how to deal with the global catastrophe in the making. He is trying to solve the blood shortage crisis as Charles Bromley (Sam Neill, Jurassic Park, Escape Plan), a vampire business leader, hordes the blood for the wealthy. As the blood runs thin, normal walking vampires turn into horrific creatures (more like your were-vampires with tones of Nosferatu) who uncontrollably attack others to get their fix. Edward gets kidnapped by Lionel “Elvis” Cormac (Willem Dafoe, Spider-Man, John Wick), an ex-vampire who has found the cure to become human again. Together, they must, under cover of daylight, discover how to cure the general population and solve the blood crisis before the vampires morph out into monstrosities.

This was just a really cool idea. I was so excited to see how it played out, and not only was I not disappointed, but I was shocked to see such political undertones in a January release horror film. There is so much ingrained about the wealthy 1% versus the other 99, the Occupy Wall Street movement (which hadn’t even really happened yet), unemployment, gas prices, and now more than ever, our fear of an outbreak that we can’t even begin to understand. In today’s world of Ebola outbreaks in the United States, this film has a lot more to say for something essentially skipped over during its general release.

The cinematography is beautiful here, as it complements the art direction of playing off an alternate version of Earth. The changes in lifestyle are so paramount and yet subtle enough to make us look inwards at our lifestyle and how so easily it sits on the brink of societal collapse. These vampires live each day thinking their lives are okay and that someone is working to help them. They live in denial, like so many of us today.

I don’t really want to get political with this movie, which boils down to being a lot of fun at the core. The vampire mythos needed to get turned over with this. We had too much Twilight in our lore at this point and needed something with a bit of bite.

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Daybreakers is a lot of fun for the casual moviegoer and for the viewer looking for a bit more of substance to his gore. Check this film out for the interesting take of the myth, a cadre of well-performed characters, and some actual thought.

 

4/5

-Kyle A. Goethe

 

For more 31 Days of Horror, click here.

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