Ennio Morricone Dead at 91

It’s a sad day for the world of cinema. Ennio Morricone, perhaps the most prolific and respected  composer in the world of film, has died at 91.

Morricone scored over 400 films along with many television projects and short films, and yet he went without Academy Awards wins until late in his life, finally winning for The Hateful Eight. He was nominated several times for the films Days of Heaven, The Mission, The Untouchables, Bugsy, and Malena.

I’m going to cover some of my favorite work from Morricone and then drop a selected filmography.

The Man With No Name Trilogy: Morricone essentially created the musical style of Spaghetti Westerns with his work on this trilogy, and his score is practically as iconic as Clint Eastwood’s lead character.

Exorcist II: The Heretic: Say what you will about this truly awful film, but Morricone’s score is still pretty damn good.

The Thing: John Carpenter’s classic isolation horror tale is made all the more claustrophobic by the chilling Morricone score that layers the film in a blanket of paranoia almost as thick as the snow on the ground.

Once Upon a Time in America: Keep making new longer cuts of this movie so that we can get more Ennio Morricone music in this movie. It’s extended cut is a staggering journal of life in old America and the score showcases a new side to Morricone’s skillset, and it reunited him with Sergio Leone.

The Untouchables: This feels like Morricone at his most bombastic and heroic. He enhanced the heroes and villains quite nicely and makes an iconic cop film even more unforgettable in the process.

The Hateful Eight: I love The Hateful Eight, and I love the score for The Hateful Eight. The movie could’ve flat-out failed, but Morricone’s music blended so well with Tarantino’s dialogue. It’s a truly special pairing.

Rest in Peace, Ennio Morricone.

Selected Filmography:

  • A Fistful of Dollars (1964)
  • For a Few Dollars More (1965)
  • The Battle of Algiers (1966)
  • The Bible: In the Beginning… (1966)
  • The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)
  • Once Upon a Time in the West (1968)
  • The Invisible Woman (1969)
  • Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (1970)
  • The Bird with the Crystal Plumage (1970)
  • The Cat o’ Nine Tails (1971)
  • The Canterbury Tales (1972)
  • Arabian Nights (1974)
  • 1900 (1976)
  • Exorcist II: The Heretic (1977)
  • Orca (1977)
  • Days of Heaven (1978)
  • The Thing (1982)
  • Once Upon a Time in America (1984)
  • Red Sonja (1985)
  • The Mission  (1986)
  • The Untouchables (1987)
  • Cinema Paradiso (1988)
  • Hamlet (1990)
  • Bugsy (1991)
  • In the Line of Fire (1993)
  • Wolf (1994)
  • Disclosure (1994)
  • U Turn (1997)
  • Lolita (1997)
  • Bulworth (1998)
  • The Legend of 1900 (1998)
  • The Phantom of the Opera (1998)
  • Mission to Mars (2000)
  • Ripley’s Game (2002)
  • The Hateful Eight (2015)

 

Do you have a favorite Ennio Morricone score? Let me know/Drop a comment down below!

-Kyle A. Goethe

The 2016 Oscars! Your thoughts?

Okay, everyone, last night, Chris Rock hosted the 2016 Oscars, and it was full of surprises and controversy! But amidst all that, how did it go? Well, I have a few bullet points thoughts on the matter:

  • The opening was great, but that was about all I needed on the controversy, an entire night of Oscar Guilt was a bit much.
  • Did Chris Rock pull an Ellen when he sold Girl Scout Cookies during the show?
  • I enjoyed the thank-you scroll on the bottom of the screen, but I don’t think the winners got it. Most of them continued to thank people when they arrived on stage. The idea of the scroll was to save time and make the speeches more memorable, but the only ones that really served that were Adam McKay, Emmanuelle Lubezki, Leonardo DiCaprio, Pete Docter, and Ennio Morricone.
  • Another thought? All the time spent on the controversy could have been better served to add more spectacle to the show. One year they did a presentation on horror films, and another year on Bond films. Could they not have spent time on John Williams and his 50th nomination perhaps? There just wasn’t enough presentation to make last night The Oscars.
  • Maybe have all five nominated songs perform, eh? (Even if I did hate Earned It)

Those are my thoughts on the show, but I want to hear yours, both on the awards show and the winners! Did Spotlight deserve the win? Did Leo? Why was Abe Vigoda missing from the In Memoriam? And seriously, did David O. Russell think everything was that hilarious last night? Let me know!

[#2016oscardeathrace] The Hateful Eight (2015)

 thehatefuleight2015a

Director: Quentin Tarantino

Cast: Samuel L. Jackson, Kurt Russell, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Walton Goggins, Demian Bichir, Tim Roth, Michael Madsen, Bruce Dern

Screenplay: Quentin Tarantino

167 mins. Rated R for bloody violence, a scene of violent sexual content, language and some graphic nudity.

  • Academy Award Nominee: Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role (Jennifer Jason Leigh) [Pending]
  • Academy Award Nominee: Best Achievement in Cinematography [Pending]
  • Academy Award Nominee: Best Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures, Original Score [Pending]

 

What happens when eight morally ambiguous humans find themselves snowed in for the weekend? You get The Hateful Eight, the newest film from writer/director Quentin Tarantino (Pulp Fiction, Django Unchained). We are first introduced to Major Marquis Warren (Samuel L. Jackson, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Chi-Raq), a famed bounty hunter known for his past transgressions in the civil war. He is out amongst the snow when he is met by John Ruth (Kurt Russell, The Thing, Bone Tomahawk), a fellow bounty hunter known as “The Hangman” who is delivering the notorious Daisy Domergue (Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Machinist, Anomalisa) to the proper authorities in Red Rock. Along the way, the three come across the new sheriff of Red Rock, or so he says, Chris Mannix (Walton Goggins, TV’s The Shield, American Ultra), and the group make their way toward Red Rock before being stranded at Minnie’s Haberdashery in the blizzard. Now, John Ruth is under the impression that one amongst the group snowed in is out to free Daisy and kill anyone in her way in this thrilling whodunit.

thehatefuleight2015c

There’s no way to get this film confused with the work of any other filmmaker. This is pure-laced Tarantino from its deepest core. There are all the stylings of this one-of-a-kind director like the gripping dialogue, the extreme violence and Samuel L. Jackson, who eats up the screen. He is matched in prowess with Kurt Russell, who proves to be perfectly matched for our director in style and wit. Jennifer Jason Leigh also steals her scenes as the morbidly chilling Daisy, but to be fair, everyone is playing their A-game here, from regular performers Tim Roth (Reservoir Dogs, Selma) and Michael Madsen (Kill Bill vol. 1, Hell Ride) to Demian Bichir (TV’s The Bridge, The Heat) as the hilarious Bob and the Bruce Dern (Nebraska, Twixt) as the racist General Sandy Smithers.

Then there’s the cinematography, expertly handled by DP Robert Richardson. The film, if you hadn’t heard, was shot using an Ultra Panavision 70 and projected in a 70mm cut, which is absolutely excellent. The frames are stark and beautiful and rich and actually help to drive the story even if a large amount of it takes place in a single shack. If you didn’t get the chance to see it in 70mm, let me assure you that both cuts of the film are terrific, so don’t feel too bad.

I also fell in love with Ennio Morricone’s original score, the first original score from the famed composer in decades. He is almost ensured to win the Oscar for it.

thehatefuleight2015d.png

The Hateful Eight could have been shorter, but I really loved the feel and grandeur of such a simple and intense whodunit like this. After two viewings, the film has continued to grow on me, and while it isn’t top-tier Tarantino, it certainly is still one of the best films of 2015.

 

4.5/5

-Kyle A. Goethe

 

For my review of Robert Rodriguez, Frank Miller, and Quentin Tarantino’s Sin City, click here.

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